Media Releases

2017

2016 Press releases

 

Increased Danger to Pets Left Alone in Cars as High Temperatures Hit the City: Ottawa Humane Society

For immediate release 

July 12, 2017 – The hot weather forecast for Ottawa this week poses a great risk to pets left alone in cars, says the Ottawa Humane Society’s executive director.

“These temperatures can kill an animal left alone in a hot car,” said Bruce Roney, OHS executive director. “If you’re running an errand, leave your pet at home. Don’t take the risk. It’s a choice that could mean the difference between life and death for your best friend.”

With the humidity, temperatures are expected to feel like 25 C and higher all week. This heat makes it crucial people never leave their pets alone in a hot car, Roney said, adding that a dog left in a sweltering vehicle can quickly overheat, leading to brain damage and even death.

If you see an animal alone in a car with the owner nowhere in sight, call the police at 911. Signs of heatstroke in dogs include:

  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Heavy panting
  • Lethargy
  • Lack of co-ordination
  • Weakness or muscle tremors
  • Unconsciousness
  • Glazed eyes
  • Convulsions

For more information, please visit the OHS website at http://www.ottawahumane.ca/your-pet/animal-tips/dogs-die-in-hot-cars/.

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

Ottawa Humane Society Makes First FIV-Positive Cats Available for Adoption

For immediate release 

July 4, 2017 – The Ottawa Humane Society has just expanded its adoption program to include cats with the FIV virus, helping even more of the animals in our community get their second chance.

“We’re really excited to be able to give these animals a shot at a happy life with a forever family,” said Bruce Roney, OHS executive director. “We think our community will step up and really embrace the opportunity to help us find even more animals a home.”

The time is right for this change, Roney said.

“We think our community is ready for this. We’ve done the research and recognize it’s time to make this change,” he said.

FIV stands for feline immunodeficiency virus, said Dr. Shelley Hutchings, OHS chief veterinarian. Only cats can get FIV, as the virus does not infect other species of animals or humans, she said.

“For us, adopting out these cats means more resources, like medical tests and our time, because we know it will take a little longer for them to find a permanent home. But to the right adopter, it’s just a member of their family in need of a little more TLC,” Hutchings said.

With proper care, FIV-positive cats may live a long and healthy life, she said. They do need a little more care than a cat without the virus, she said.

“We’re talking about twice yearly vet visits, some blood work. Maybe some extra dental care,” Hutchings said. “We know this will be daunting to some people but to the right match, it won’t be.”

The most common way FIV is spread is through bite wounds. Because of this, FIV-positive cats at the OHS are only adopted into homes with no other cats, Hutchings said.

“We think these cats deserve the same chance as every other feline in our Adoption Centre. These creatures will make loving companions to some lucky adopters,” Hutchings said.

To learn more about the program, please visit the Ottawa Humane Society at 245 West Hunt Club Rd.

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

Ottawa Humane Society to Hold Microchip Clinic Sunday, July 9

For immediate release 

July 4, 2017 – The Ottawa Humane Society has just expanded its adoption program to include cats with the FIV virus, helping even more of the animals in our community get their second chance.

“We’re really excited to be able to give these animals a shot at a happy life with a forever family,” said Bruce Roney, OHS executive director. “We think our community will step up and really embrace the opportunity to help us find even more animals a home.”

The time is right for this change, Roney said.

“We think our community is ready for this. We’ve done the research and recognize it’s time to make this change,” he said.

FIV stands for feline immunodeficiency virus, said Dr. Shelley Hutchings, OHS chief veterinarian. Only cats can get FIV, as the virus does not infect other species of animals or humans, she said.

“For us, adopting out these cats means more resources, like medical tests and our time, because we know it will take a little longer for them to find a permanent home. But to the right adopter, it’s just a member of their family in need of a little more TLC,” Hutchings said.

With proper care, FIV-positive cats may live a long and healthy life, she said. They do need a little more care than a cat without the virus, she said.

“We’re talking about twice yearly vet visits, some blood work. Maybe some extra dental care,” Hutchings said. “We know this will be daunting to some people but to the right match, it won’t be.”

The most common way FIV is spread is through bite wounds. Because of this, FIV-positive cats at the OHS are only adopted into homes with no other cats, Hutchings said.

“We think these cats deserve the same chance as every other feline in our Adoption Centre. These creatures will make loving companions to some lucky adopters,” Hutchings said.

To learn more about the program, please visit the Ottawa Humane Society at 245 West Hunt Club Rd.

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

Ottawa Humane Society Nearly Full in Advance of Busiest Weekend of the Year, Needs Community’s Help to Avert a Crisis

For immediate release 

June 30, 2017 – The Ottawa Humane Society is in urgent need of adopters, foster volunteers, and donations to manage a sudden spike in its animal population in advance of the long weekend.

Canada Day is always the shelter’s busiest day of the year, with dozens of lost pets spooked by Canada Day fireworks expected to wind up at the OHS, straining its resources even more.

The shelter’s animal population is reaching a critical level, with more than 600 animals in its care right now.

“We really need the community to help the animals right away, especially with the Canada Day long weekend,” said Bruce Roney, OHS executive director. “We’re working hard to prevent a situation where we’re stacking cages and temporarily turning away owners who want to surrender their pets.”

There are 36 animals waiting for a foster placement right now.

“Becoming a foster volunteer gives these animals a second chance,” Roney said. “It’s one of three ways we need the community’s help right now, the other two being adoptions and donations.”

Finding permanent homes for 117 cats, dogs and small animals available for adoption from the OHS and its Pet Adoption Location partners would alleviate some of the pressure, Roney said.

“If you’ve been thinking about it, now’s a perfect time to adopt from us,” he said.

Roney said the high population means increased costs for everything medicine to food for the animals. Summer is the time when costs are at their highest and donations at their lowest, he said.

For information on how to adopt, foster or donate, please visit the Ottawa Humane Society website at www.ottawahumane.ca.

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

Annual Influx of Spooked, Lost Pets the Dark Side to Canada Day Festivities: Ottawa Humane Society

For immediate release 

July 4, 2017 – If your pet goes missing, what are the chances it will find its way home? The Ottawa Humane Society is urging pet owners to take precautions to ensure that if their dog or cat becomes lost, it has the best possible chance of a safe return — by implanting a grain-sized microchip offering permanent, life-long identification.

The OHS is holding its seventh microchip clinic of 2017 on Sunday, July 9 at its 245 West Hunt Club Rd. shelter.

The clinic takes place as follows:

When: Sunday, July 9, from 9 a.m. to noon.

Cost: $50 for the first pet, $25 for each additional pet.

Please note: Pets brought in for a microchip should be in a carrier or on a leash. Owners are asked to bring vaccination records and one piece of ID, such as a driver’s licence.

Where: Hosted by the Ottawa Humane Society at 245 West Hunt Club Rd., between Prince of Wales Drive and Merivale Road.

Book your appointment today! Call 613-725-3166, ext. 221, or email microchip@ottawahumane.ca.

All proceeds benefit the animals at the OHS.

For more information, visit www.ottawahumane.ca. The clinic is sponsored by Dr. Shelley Hutchings.

 

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

The Ottawa Humane Society is Throwing a Kitten Shower This Sunday and Everyone’s Invited!

For immediate release 

June 23, 2017 — The Ottawa Humane Society cordially invites you to celebrate the arrival of our newest bundles of joy this Sunday!

We’re expecting the pitter-patter of 3,200 tiny paws in our shelter by the end of summer, leaving us with 800 new little ones to care for.

To celebrate their arrival, join us for traditional baby shower games and some kitten-themed treats for purchase.

We’re asking attendees to honour the newest arrivals with items from our Wish List, including receiving blankets and cat nip.

When: Sunday, June 25 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Where: Ottawa Humane Society at 245 West Hunt Club Rd.

Why: It’s kitten season!

For more information and to help, please visit www.ottawahumane.ca.

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

Cute Overload as Kittens in Need of a Second Chance Overtake the Ottawa Humane Society

Hundreds of kittens like Johnny coming to the OHS for help this summer

Johnny, one of the kittens at the OHS

For immediate release 

June 15, 2017 — Johnny the kitten is really no different than the roughly 799 other baby cats the Ottawa Humane Society expects to see this season. Sure, he has a tiny thumb attached to each paw making him a polydactyl, the technical term for extra toes. But like all kittens at the OHS, Johnny will need loving care and medical attention until he’s ready for a new family.

It’s kitten season — that time of year when pregnant female cats give birth, stretching OHS resources to their max. There will be hundreds of teeny mouths to feed, spay or neuter surgeries to schedule, foster homes to arrange, health checks and vaccines to administer, and finally forever homes to procure.

The OHS is seeking foster volunteers, donations and homes to give these kittens the fighting chance at life they deserve.

So far in 2017, the OHS has cared for a total of 519 kittens.

“No animal in need is ever turned away and this includes hundreds of kittens every year,” said Bruce Roney, OHS executive director. “It’s only going to get busier as we hit summer.”

Some kittens have already grown big and strong enough for the Adoption Centre but many more — some orphaned and needing specialized care — have just arrived at the OHS, with dozens upon dozens more expected by the time fall rolls around.

“We want to get to a point where we no longer have a huge influx of kittens every summer. We can only do that by spreading the word about spaying and neuetering and through our new mobile spay and neuter clinic,” Roney said. “Until then, we will be there for every kitten in need in our community.”

For more information and to help, please visit www.ottawahumane.ca.

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

Deadly Summer Danger: Ottawa Humane Society Treating Two Cats for High Rise Syndrome

For immediate release 

June 12, 2017 – It’s as predictable as the change in season: the second the weather warms up, the Ottawa Humane Society has an influx of seriously hurt cats who’ve fallen from open windows or a balcony.

It’s called High-Rise Syndrome — a potentially deadly but common annual happenstance.

There are two such cats at the OHS right now — Chico the tabby, who has been on strict cage rest with a broken pelvis since March 29, and Ti-Gars the Himalayan, who arrived June 3 suffering from a fractured hip. In separate incidents, both fell from third-floor balconies, suffered painful injuries, and face long recoveries.

It is a myth that cats always land on their feet. Cats perch in dangerous, high places. Many guardians believe their cats will not fall. But they do fall. Sometimes a cat that has been watching a bird will become so focused, she may step out into thin air.

“It doesn’t have to be this way,” said Bruce Roney, OHS executive director. “A couple little changes could mean the difference between life and death for your cat.”

Never let a cat outside unsupervised, Roney said. Securely screen or close windows, he said.

If Your Cat Should Fall:

  • Never assume that your cat has been killed, even if you look down and see her lying lifeless.
  • Do not give up looking should your cat disappear after a fall. It is not uncommon for cats to hide in bushes or creep into buildings if the fall has upset or frightened them.
  • Call your veterinarian immediately.

For more information, please visit www.ottawahumane.ca

 

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

Ottawa Humane Society Asking Community to Boycott Friday Bull Riding Event at TD Place

For immediate release 

June 7, 2017 – The Ottawa Humane Society is asking our community to boycott this Friday’s bull riding event at Lansdowne to send organizers the message that it’s inhumane and has no place in our city.

The Professional Bull Riders (PBR) Monster Energy Tour will be rolling into Ottawa’s TD Place June 9 for their bull riding extravaganza. Promoters are calling it “Man vs. Beast,” but it’s really an animal cruelty showcase.

“This event is inhumane and we’re imploring our community to boycott it,” said Bruce Roney, OHS executive director. “We’re also asking people to sign our petition that we’ll be giving to the City of Ottawa Friday afternoon asking it to prevent bull riding from ever coming to Ottawa again.”

The OHS opposes the use of animals in entertainment acts causing physical or psychological harm. This includes bull riding.

Bull riders use electric prods, spurs and straps tightened around the animal’s abdomen/genitals to make the bull buck and charge — they’re bucking to stop the pain. It’s a lifetime of torment that begins when the youngest bulls are chosen with criteria that weeds out all but those with the most hysterical reaction to the suffering.

“These practices are abusive, cruel and stressful and have no place in our community,” Roney said.

Show PBR that Ottawa vehemently opposes the cruel treatment of animals and that their event is not welcome here by not attending and by signing the OHS’s petition at www.ottawahumane.ca/StoptheBull  

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

Found A Baby Animal? Check With The Experts For How To Help

For immediate release 

May 18, 2017 – Stumbling upon a baby animal that needs help usually brings out the maternal instincts in all of us. But spotting a baby animal by himself doesn’t necessarily mean he’s an orphan.

Many wildlife parents leave their young alone during the day, sometimes for long periods. The mother is usually nearby and quite conscious of her young. Also, keep in mind that despite their small size, many young animals are actually independent enough to fend for themselves.

Wildlife rehab centres in Ottawa are filling up with animals that wouldn’t have needed the service had they been left alone. So how can you tell if an animal needs your help or should be left alone? Please call the Ottawa Humane Society at 613-725-3166, ext. 221, or visit www.ottawahumane.ca/juvenile-or-baby-wildlife/ for information on what to do if you find a baby animal. You may also call the Rideau Valley Wildlife Sanctuary at 613-258-9480 for help.

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

OTTAWA HUMANE SOCIETY TO HOLD MICROCHIP CLINIC SUNDAY, MAY 7

For immediate release 

May 2, 2017 – If your pet goes missing, what are the chances it will find its way home? The Ottawa Humane Society is urging pet owners to take precautions to ensure that if their dog or cat becomes lost, it has the best possible chance of a safe return — by implanting a grain-sized microchip offering permanent, life-long identification.

The OHS is holding its fifth microchip clinic of 2017 on Sunday, May 7 at its 245 West Hunt Club Rd. shelter.

The clinic takes place as follows:

When: Sunday, May 7, from 9 a.m. to noon.

Cost: $50 for the first pet, $25 for each additional pet.

Please note: Pets brought in for a microchip should be in a carrier or on a leash. Owners are asked to bring vaccination records and one piece of ID, such as a driver’s licence.

Where: Hosted by the Ottawa Humane Society at 245 West Hunt Club Rd., between Prince of Wales Drive and Merivale Road.

Book your appointment today! Call 613-725-3166, ext. 221, or email microchip@ottawahumane.ca.

All proceeds benefit the animals at the OHS.

For more information, visit www.ottawahumane.ca. The clinic is sponsored by Dr. Shelley Hutchings.

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

 

Celebrate A Hoppy Easter With the Animals This Sunday at the Ottawa Humane Society!

For immediate release 

April 6, 2017 – There are no egg-scuses this year for missing A Hoppy Easter at the Ottawa Humane Society!

Hip hop your way to the OHS for some free family fun on Sunday, April 9, from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Easter-themed activities and treats will include:

  • Egg races
  • Easter Bunny visits
  •  Scavenger hunt
  • OHS Auxiliary and Critter Crafters craft and bake sale
  • Easter-themed crafts and activities

For more information, please visit www.ottawahumane.ca/events/hoppy-easter-family-event/

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

-30-

For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

Ottawa Humane Society to Hold Microchip Clinic Sunday, April 9

For immediate release 

April 5, 2017 – If your pet goes missing, what are the chances it will find its way home? The Ottawa Humane Society is urging pet owners to take precautions to ensure that if their dog or cat becomes lost, it has the best possible chance of a safe return — by implanting a grain-sized microchip offering permanent, life-long identification.

The OHS is holding its fourth microchip clinic of 2017 on Sunday, April 9 at its 245 West Hunt Club Rd. shelter.

The clinic takes place as follows:

When: Sunday, April 9, from 9 a.m. to noon.

Cost: $50 for the first pet, $25 for each additional pet.

Please note: Pets brought in for a microchip should be in a carrier or on a leash. Owners are asked to bring vaccination records and one piece of ID, such as a driver’s licence.

Where: Hosted by the Ottawa Humane Society at 245 West Hunt Club Rd., between Prince of Wales Drive and Merivale Road.

Book your appointment today! Call 613-725-3166, ext. 221, or email microchip@ottawahumane.ca.

All proceeds benefit the animals at the OHS.

For more information, visit www.ottawahumane.ca. The clinic is sponsored by Dr. Shelley Hutchings.

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

 

Be on the Lookout for Lost, Scared Pets After Fire at Baseline and Merivale Row Houses: Ottawa Humane Society

For immediate release 

March 13, 2017 – The Ottawa Humane Society is asking people to be on the lookout for lost, scared pets after a fire tore through a row-house complex Sunday afternoon near Baseline and Merivale Roads.

Two displaced tenants have already contacted the OHS for help finding four missing cats, filling out reports in an effort to be reunited with their pets. Staff are anticipating many more such reports, said Sarah Oswald, OHS manager of admissions and rehoming.

“If you find a stray animal in that neighbourhood, please bring the animal to the OHS at 245 West Hunt Club Rd. We have families out there who have been doubly devastated, first losing everything in a fire and now missing a beloved pet,” Oswald said.

Lost pets will have safe and warm shelter at the OHS until they’re reunited with their families, she said.

“And, if you’re missing your pet, please contact us to report it,” Oswald said.

To report a lost or found pet, please call 613-725-9998 or visit www.ottawahumane.ca/services/lost-and-found to make a report anytime.

Please visit the OHS website at www.ottawahumane.ca for directions and business hours.

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

Ottawa Humane Society to Hold Microchip Clinic Sunday, March 12

For immediate release 

March 7, 2017 – If your pet goes missing, what are the chances it will find its way home? The Ottawa Humane Society is urging pet owners to take precautions to ensure that if their dog or cat becomes lost, it has the best possible chance of a safe return — by implanting a grain-sized microchip offering permanent, life-long identification.

The OHS is holding its third microchip clinic of 2017 on Sunday, March 12 at its 245 West Hunt Club Rd. shelter.

The clinic takes place as follows:

When: Sunday, March 12, from 9 a.m. to noon.

Cost: $50 for the first pet, $25 for each additional pet.

Please note: Pets brought in for a microchip should be in a carrier or on a leash. Owners are asked to bring vaccination records and one piece of ID, such as a driver’s licence.

Where: Hosted by the Ottawa Humane Society at 245 West Hunt Club Rd., between Prince of Wales Drive and Merivale Road.

Book your appointment today! Call 613-725-3166, ext. 221, or email microchip@ottawahumane.ca.

All proceeds benefit the animals at the OHS.

For more information, visit www.ottawahumane.ca. The clinic is sponsored by Dr. Shelley Hutchings.

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

 

Ottawa Humane Society to Hold Microchip Clinic Sunday, Feb. 12

For immediate release 

Feb. 7, 2017 – If your pet goes missing, what are the chances it will find its way home? The Ottawa Humane Society is urging pet owners to take precautions to ensure that if their dog or cat becomes lost, it has the best possible chance of a safe return — by implanting a grain-sized microchip offering permanent, life-long identification.

The OHS is holding its second microchip clinic of 2017 on Sunday, Feb. 12 at its 245 West Hunt Club Rd. shelter.

The clinic takes place as follows:

When: Sunday, Feb. 12, from 9 a.m. to noon.

Cost: $50 for the first pet, $25 for each additional pet.

Please note: Pets brought in for a microchip should be in a carrier or on a leash. Owners are asked to bring vaccination records and one piece of ID, such as a driver’s licence.

Where: Hosted by the Ottawa Humane Society at 245 West Hunt Club Rd., between Prince of Wales Drive and Merivale Road.

Book your appointment today! Call 613-725-3166, ext. 221, or email microchip@ottawahumane.ca.

All proceeds benefit the animals at the OHS.

For more information, visit www.ottawahumane.ca. The clinic is sponsored by Dr. Shelley Hutchings.

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.

Protect Pets From Dangerously Cold Temperatures Forecast to Hit Ottawa Tonight

For immediate release 

Jan. 13, 2017 – The extreme cold forecast for the city tonight means pets left outside too long risk frostbite and even death without shelter from the frigid weather.

Ottawa Public Health has issued a frostbite advisory for tonight into tomorrow morning as temperatures are expected to hit as low as -25 C with the wind chill. Cold weather can be as dangerous for animals as it is people.

Pet owners can protect their animals from the cold by taking a few precautions:

  • Cats should live indoors year-round and never be allowed to roam in the cold.
  • Limit the time your dog spends outside. Take your dog for shorter, more frequent walks.
  • Consider a sweater or coat for your dog.
  • Be sure to wipe your dog’s paws after returning from a walk to remove salt, sand and other chemicals designed to melt ice and snow.
  • Dogs that live outside are required by law to have an insulated doghouse built from weather-proof material, facing away from prevailing winds. The shelter must be elevated from the ground with a door flap and bedding.
  • Keep an eye on outdoor water bowls. Make sure your pet’s water hasn’t frozen in the cold.
  • Don’t leave your pet in a cold car for a long period of time.
  • Be mindful of animals that may have crawled under your car to keep warm. Bang on the hood a couple times to scare away cats and wildlife.

If you see an animal in distress, please call the OHS emergency line at 613-725-1532.

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

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Ottawa Humane Society to Hold Microchip Clinic Sunday, Jan. 8

For immediate release 

Jan. 3, 2017 – If your pet goes missing, what are the chances it will find its way home? The Ottawa Humane Society is urging pet owners to take precautions to ensure that if their dog or cat becomes lost, it has the best possible chance of a safe return — by implanting a grain-sized microchip offering permanent, life-long identification.

The OHS is holding its first microchip clinic of 2017 on Sunday, Jan. 8 at its 245 West Hunt Club Rd. shelter.

The clinic takes place as follows:

When: Sunday, Jan. 8, from noon to 3 p.m.

Cost: $50 for the first pet, $25 for each additional pet.

Please note: Pets brought in for a microchip should be in a carrier or on a leash. Owners are asked to bring vaccination records and one piece of ID, such as a driver’s licence.

Where: Ottawa Humane Society, 245 West Hunt Club Rd., between Prince of Wales Drive and Merivale Road.

Book your appointment today! Call 613-725-3166, ext. 221, or email microchip@ottawahumane.ca.

All proceeds benefit the animals at the OHS.

For more information, visit www.ottawahumane.ca.

A Word About the Ottawa Humane Society:

The Ottawa Humane Society is a registered charity founded in 1888. The society works in and with the community to provide leadership in the humane treatment of all animals, to address the causes of animal suffering, to encourage people to take responsibility for their animal companions, and to provide care for animals who are neglected, abused, exploited, stray, or homeless.

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For media enquiries, contact:
Natalie Pona, Manager: Communications
Ottawa Humane Society
613-725-3166, ext. 261
www.ottawahumane.ca

Back to top.