Humane Wildlife Solutions

Humane Wildlife Solutions

Wildlife issues are frustrating. However, wildlife issues are temporary problems and there are solutions. It seems daunting, but if you work out a solution, you can make sure you never have this problem again. Property owners are responsible for dealing with their wildlife situation humanely and legally.

Here are some questions to ask a wildlife control agency to ensure their practices are humane:

  • Where will the animal(s) be relocated?
    Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources regulations prohibit the moving of animals more than one kilometer. If the operator tells you the animal is to be moved further, he or she does not understand the law or is intending to break it on your behalf.
  • Is your company familiar with the birthing seasons of all species of wildlife in this area?
    The company should be well versed in each species birthing season i.e. Raccoons – March & June, Squirrels – Spring & late summer/early Fall, Groundhogs – April/May, Skunks – May/June.
  • Does your company provide removal of wildlife during the birthing season?
    The removal of wildlife during the birthing season may cause orphans and death if not done properly. Responsible operators will suggest a ‘grace period’ until the young can be safely removed along with the mother or until they vacate on their own.
  • Does your company provide humane animal proofing as part of the overall solution package before or after attempting removals?
    In most situations, this will prevent further conflict and will be cost effective for the homeowner. Responsible operators will tell you this. Others will not and are perhaps looking for repeat business.
  • Does your company provide conflict resolution and education?
    The companies should be well versed in each species and may be able to give homeowners solutions that may be less risky for the animal than removal.
  • Is your company familiar with the biology and behavior of local species of small wildlife?
    In order to effectively deal with each species, they must be familiar with the habits, behaviors, etc. of the various species common to this geographical area. They should know whether or not an animal is nocturnal or diurnal, where the animal commonly makes its home, how many young each species may have, etc.
  • Does your company comply with the Ontario Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act?
    This is an absolute requirement, as the OMNR will prosecute non-compliant companies or members of the public who take matters into their own hands.
  • Has your staff had pre-exposure rabies vaccinations or any other vaccinations?
    This is a health and safety concern. Responsible operators will protect their staff.
  • What type of training do you provide your employees?
    Wildlife operators should have hands-on training and continue to keep themselves updated on all issues around wildlife as the law and ‘best practices’ change over time.